Upcoming Events at ETSU

The following events are open to the public and free unless otherwise noted. 

Black History Month: Red, Black and Green Ribbon Giveaway
Feb. 1-2, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., D.P. Culp Center ticket booth, second floor
Tri-colored ribbons will be given away in commemoration of Black History Month, as well as information on the meaning of the colors by Marcus Garvey.  Sponsored by Multicultural Affairs.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Black History Month: “Breaking Chains: The Black Labels”
Feb. 1, 7 p.m., D.P. Culp Center forum
Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

“Levity and Brevity: Your Essential Tools to Sustainability”
Feb. 2, noon, D.P. Culp Center, East Tennessee Room
Susan Lachmann, host of WETS-FM/HD’s “Women on Air,” will share how levity and brevity can help individuals who are tired or befuddled, and perhaps even feel “derailed.”  This interactive workshop in the Women’s Personal Enrichment Lunch Break Series includes art, music, movement and role-playing.  Participants are welcome to bring their lunch.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

Black History Month: “The Truth about the Black Lives Matter Movement”
Feb. 2, 7 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Multicultural Center presentation room
Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

“Women on Wednesdays”
Feb. 3, noon-1 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Multicultural Center presentation room
Documentary filmmaker Shara K. Lange will discuss “Documentary Film Engagement” in the first “Women on Wednesdays” talk of the spring semester.  Lange is assistant professor and head of the Radio/Television/Film Program in the ETSU Department of Mass Communication.  A light lunch will be provided.  Contact: Women’s Studies Program, 439-4135. 

Leading Voices Lecture: “A Conversation on Measuring What Matters Most”
Feb. 4, 7 p.m., Millennium Centre
Dr. J. Michael McGinnis, senior scholar and executive officer at the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), will deliver this address in the “Leading Voices in Public Health” lecture series sponsored by ETSU’s College of Public Health and Public Health Student Association.  An active, front-line participant in national and international health policy for more than four decades, McGinnis is senior scholar at NAM.  He is also an elected member of the organization, executive director of its Leadership Consortium on Value and Science-Driven Health Care and founder and facilitator of its Learning Health System Initiative.  He helped create some of the nation’s most important public health initiatives, including the Healthy People program and the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, while holding a continuous appointment at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through four presidential administrations.  A meet-and-greet with McGinnis will take place from 6:15-6:45 p.m.  The lecture will also be available via livestream at http://elearning.etsu.edu/live/publichealth.htm.  Contact: College of Public Health, 439-4243. 

Dance Showcase 2016
Feb. 4-6, 7:30 p.m., and Feb. 7, 2 p.m., Bud Frank Theatre, Gilbreath Hall
Aerial dance is the featured style of this showcase of choreography from ETSU dance students and faculty.  Performers will dance on silks, low-flying trapeze and lyra.  Admission: $15 for adults and $7 for students and seniors.  Contact: Division of Theatre and Dance box office, 439-6511. 

Guest Artist Recital: Arunesh Nadgir
Feb. 5, 7:30 p.m., Brown Hall auditorium
Pianist Arunesh Nadgir has performed in the U.S., South America, Europe and Asia and is currently a member of the music faculty at Middle Tennessee State University.  In his ETSU debut, he will present works by Haydn, Takamitsu, Scriabin and Schumann.  Admission: $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and free for students with ID.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Darwin Day
Feb. 6, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., ETSU and General Shale Natural History Museum, Gray Fossil Site
A variety of activities are scheduled in observance of this international celebration of science, including children’s activities (scavenger hunt and lessons on scientific topics), a noon lecture titled “Views of Science and Religion Among the American Public (with Special Reference to Evolution)” by Dr. Joseph Baker of ETSU’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and a 1 p.m. talk titled “Indefatigable Naturalists: Wallace and Darwin on the Evolutionary Trail” by Dr. Jim Costa, a professor in the Department of Biology at Western Carolina University and executive director of the Highlands Biological Station.  Contact: Natural History Museum, 439-3659 or info@grayfossilsite.com

Chinese Spring Festival
Feb. 6, 4-8 p.m., Baptist Collegiate Ministry
In this celebration of the traditional Chinese New Year, participants will enjoy entertainment, interactive games and authentic food, and will learn how to make Chinese dumplings.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Faculty Recital: “Not-for-Tuba”
Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m., Mathes Hall auditorium
Tuba instructor Dr. Stephanie Frye of the ETSU Department of Music will perform works composed from the 1700s through the 21st century, none of which were written for the tuba.  She will be joined by Ann Lavender on piano, Art Haecker on trombone, mezzo-soprano Opal Clark, and Dr. Rande Sanderbeck on percussion.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Black History Month: Voter Registration and Information on Presidential Candidates
Feb. 8-11, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., D.P. Culp Center ticket booth, second floor
Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

“Positive/Negative 31” National Juried Art Exhibition
Feb. 8-March 4, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, Slocumb Galleries
This annual exhibition of innovative contemporary art exposes the region to current trends and directions in visual art, provides a platform for dialogue, and promotes diversity, creative excellence and critical thinking.  This year’s juror is Al Miner, assistant curator at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.  The awards reception and juror’s lecture will be held Feb. 18 from 5-7 p.m.  The exhibit is presented by the ETSU Department of Art and Design and Slocumb Galleries in partnership with the Honors College and Student Government Association B.U.C. Fund.  In addition to the regular hours above, Slocumb offers extended hours until 6 p.m. on Thursdays and other times by appointment.  Contact: Slocumb Galleries, 483-3179 or contrera@etsu.edu

Film Screening: “Art and Craft”
Feb. 8, 7 p.m., Ball Hall auditorium
This documentary film, subtitled “He puts the artist in con artist,” follows art forger Mark Landis and the people out to expose and stop him.  The madcap caper shines on the universal need for appreciation.  This event includes a reception and a question-and-answer session with the filmmaker.  Part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers.  Contact: Mary B. Martin School of the Arts, 439-TKTS (8587). 

“Love, Love, Love”
Feb. 9, noon, 233 Campus Center Building
Artist and creative coach Pam Murray will guide participants through exploring what an individual’s “life journey looks like with love as the focus” in this Women’s Personal Enrichment Lunch Break Workshop.  Participants are welcome to bring their lunch.  Reservations are required.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

Black History Month: Open Mic Night
Feb. 9, 7 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, The Cave
This annual event, hosted this year by Abyss, brings poets, singers, rappers and storytellers to the mic to share their talents and explore their individuality, creativity, and artistic and cultural expression.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Basler Lecture: “A Presence of Sound”
Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m., Ball Hall auditorium
Musicologist Dr. Jeff Todd Titon will explore sound and presence in the first of four public lectures he will deliver this spring as chairholder of ETSU’s Wayne G. Basler Chair of Excellence for the Integration of the Arts, Rhetoric and Science.  “Sounds say, ‘Here I am,’” he writes.  “Sound announces presence to the sounder and any listener feeling the sounder’s resonance.  Experiencing sound locates a being in space and time.  Swelling, pulsating, fading in time, sound’s echo reveals location and direction, shape, extension, and sometimes attitude or mood.”  Titon will answer such questions as how sound is present in human consciousness, how animals are aware of sound, and how and what sounds communicate.  Through this and his remaining three talks (“A Community of Sound” on March 1, “An Economy of Sound” on March 29 and “An Ecology of Sound” on April 19), Titon will explore sound and sociality and propose a sound ecology.  Contact: Department of Appalachian Studies, 439-7072. 

Deadline for Prom and Formal-wear Donations
Feb. 12, Women’s Resource Center, 220 Campus Center Building
ETSU’s Women’s Resource Center is once again partnering with the Bristol YWCA to provide low-cost prom- and formal-wear to young women in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia.  “Like new” or “gently used” prom or formal dresses, shoes and accessories may be dropped off at the WRC.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

“The Magic Flute”
Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Martha Street Culp Auditorium
The Opera Workshop from ETSU’s Department of Music presents this production of Mozart’s harrowing tale of a prince who sets out to free a princess from her captors.  Along the way, the prince meets many magical characters, faces dangerous trials and finds himself in a battle of good versus evil.  Admission: $10 for adults and $5 for seniors and students with ID.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276.

Observatory Open House
Feb. 13, 8 p.m., Harry Powell Observatory
Visitors will have the opportunity to view celestial objects in the night sky through the observatory’s computer-controlled telescopes.  Dr. Donald Luttermoser, chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, will give a short presentation on “The Dwarf Planet Ceres Up Close,” after which ETSU astronomers will be available to assist visitors with the telescopes.  The open house will be cancelled if the sky is cloudy.  Contact: Dr. Beverly Smith, 439-8418. 

Black History Month: “How Black History Month Came to Be”
Feb. 15, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., D.P. Culp Center forum
Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Black History Month: “Family Feud”
Feb. 15, 6:30 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Multicultural Center presentation room
Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Black History Month: “Sankofa: African American Museum”
Feb. 16, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., D.P. Culp Center ballroom right
“Sankofa” means using the wisdom of the past to build the future, and as part of this exhibit, Angela Jennings presents stories and dramatizations about selected periods and historical figures to allow the audience to “experience” both the pain and pride of the people and the history portrayed.  This traveling exhibit spans the period of 1860 to the present and includes a journey through slavery and the days of emancipation; portrayals of such figures as Ida B. Wells, the Negro Baseball League and the Tuskegee Airmen; and a display of inventions by African Americans.  Sponsored by the Black Affairs Association.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

“An Evening of Health, Wellness and the Arts” with Comedian Drew Lynch
Feb. 16, 7 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Martha Street Culp Auditorium
Since suffering a vocal cord injury playing softball at age 20, Drew Lynch has laughed a lot, using the stutter resulting from the injury to launch a comedy career.  Now 23, Lynch came in second in season 10 of “America’s Got Talent” last summer and is now on a national tour, with a stop at ETSU for a special evening that crosses and connects disciplines.  This annual event, co-sponsored by the College of Public Health and Mary B. Martin School of the Arts, includes a reception and exhibits by public health students.  Contact: Mary B. Martin School of the Arts, 439-TKTS (8587). 

Book Review Group
Feb. 17, noon, Women’s Resource Center, 220 Campus Center Building
Members will meet to discuss The Memory House by Linda Goodnight.  New members are welcome, and participants may bring their lunch.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

Black History Month: "Expressions of Diversity: Poetry, Art, and Music"
Feb. 17, 5 p.m., Reece Museum
This performance is sponsored by the African and African American Studies Program in the Department of History.  Contact: Dr. Dorothy Drinkard-Hawkshawe, 439-6688.

“Love Your Body Day” Expo
Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., D.P. Culp Center ballroom
This event features a variety of interactive information booths, giveaways, and access to everything from free massage therapy to healthy eating tips and women’s health information.  Contact: Counseling Center, 439-4841. 

Planetarium Show
Feb. 18, 7 and 8 p.m., Hutcheson Hall planetarium
Two showings are scheduled for “Firefall,” a new, full-dome video program that tells the story of comets, meteors and asteroids.  “Throughout Earth’s violent history, impacts from comets and asteroids have mercilessly shaped its surface,” said Dr. Gary Henson, ETSU associate professor of Physics and Astronomy and planetarium director.  “The ancient barrage continues today, from harmless meteors – those brilliant streaks in the night sky – to mountain-sized boulders wandering perilously close to Earth.”  Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy.  Contact: Dr. Gary Henson, 439-6906 or hensong@etsu.edu

“Ancient, Modern and the In-Between”
Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m., St. John’s Episcopal Church, 500 N. Roan St., Johnson City
The Paramount Chamber Players will present this program featuring composers Handel, Vivaldi, Debussy and Dvorak, who, in their own ways, broke the rules either musically or societally to lay the groundwork for future generations of composers.  Musicians, some of whom are ETSU music faculty members, are Craig W. Combs, piano; Vicki Fey, organ; Rebecca Paluzzi, flute; Luis Casal, viola; Cherylonda Fitzgerald and Thomas Maternik, cello; and Kimberly Ziegler, violin.  Admission: $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and free for students with ID.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Black History Month: Movie Screening
Feb. 19, 7 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Martha Street Culp Auditorium
Film title TBA.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Jerry Douglas Presents The Earls of Leicester
Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m., D.P. Culp Center, Martha Street Culp Auditorium
Thirteen-time Grammy Award-winner and dobro player Jerry Douglas has arrayed his “all-star dream team” of bluegrass greats to create The Earls of Leicester to perform the legendary music of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs.  Douglas is joined by Shawn Camp on lead vocals and guitar, ETSU alumnus Barry Bales on bass and vocals, Charlie Cushman on banjo and guitar and Johnny Warren on fiddle.  The group won a Grammy for the 2015 Best Bluegrass Album with its debut CD.  The ETSU Bluegrass Pride Band will open the show.  Admission: $30 for adults, $25 for seniors and $12 for students with ID; tickets available at www.etsu.edu/martin.  Contact: Mary B. Martin School of the Arts, 439-TKTS (8587). 

Music & Friends Concert: “Winds and Brass and some mo…”
Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m., Mathes Hall auditorium
Events in the Department of Music’s Music & Friends Concert Series always contain an element of surprise, and this concert is no exception. Has anyone dared to put together an ensemble made up of oboe, clarinet, trombone, tuba and piano? Performers include ETSU music faculty members Dr. Heather Killmeyer, oboe; Frederick Lemmons, clarinet; Art Haecker, trombone; Dr. Stephanie Frye, tuba; and Dr. Esther Park, piano.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

“Re-Generation: The Johnson City Story Slam”
Feb. 19, 8-10 p.m., Nelson Fine Art Center, 324 E. Main Street
“Faithful” is the theme of the February event in this ongoing series sponsored by the ETSU Storytelling Program and Department of Communication and Performance.  Tellers and judges will be chosen from the audience, and the first-place winner will take home a cash prize.  This event is not suitable for children.  Admission is a suggested donation of $5-$10.  Contact: Storytelling Program, 439-7606. 

Black History Month: Semi-Formal Dance
Feb. 20, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., D.P. Culp Center ballroom
This annual dance provides participants an opportunity to dress up and enjoy “an evening of elegance.”  All students are welcome to attend.  Free refreshments and music are provided.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

Black History Month: Spirit Week
Feb. 22-26, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., D.P. Culp Center ticket booth, second floor
This tabling activity features a different theme for each day of the week: “All Black Everything” on Monday, “Blast from the Past” on Tuesday, “He Said, She Said” on Wednesday, “Black People in the Workplace” on Thursday and “Say It Loud Selfie” on Friday.  Contact: Multicultural Affairs, 439-6633 or mcstaffts@etsu.edu

“Lowering Your Cholesterol”
Feb. 23, noon, D.P. Culp Center, East Tennessee Room
Practical nutrition and lifestyle tips to help improve cholesterol and triglyceride levels will be provided by Pam King, a registered nurse with Mountain States Health Alliance, in this Women’s Health Series Lunch Break Seminar.  Participants are invited to bring their lunch.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

Fossil and Artifact ID Night
Feb. 23, 4-6 p.m., ETSU and General Shale Natural History Museum and Visitor Center
Members of the community are invited to bring fossils, rocks, minerals and artifacts to be identified and photographed by the team of experts at the museum and visitor center at the Gray Fossil Site.  Light refreshments will be served.  Contact: Natural History Museum, 439-3659 or grayfossilmuseum@etsu.edu

Guest Artist Recital: Cathal Breslin
Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., Mathes Hall auditorium
Pianist Cathal Breslin’s international career has taken him to Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall in London and the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing.  The native of Ireland will present a program that includes “Totentanze” by Liszt and “The Nutcracker” by Tchaikovsky.  Admission: $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and free for students with ID.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276.

“STOP Violence Against Teenage and Adult Women”
Feb. 24, noon, D.P. Culp Center, East Tennessee Room
ETSU Public Safety Officer Amanda Worley will present this educational awareness, crime victim prevention program aimed at reducing the risk of exposure to violence.  Part of the Women’s Personal and Professional Enrichment Series Lunch Break Seminars.  Participants are invited to bring their lunch.  Contact: Women’s Resource Center, 439-5772. 

Thomas J. Ellis Sports Medicine Symposium
Feb. 26, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Stanton-Gerber Hall, small auditorium
This continuing medical education symposium for primary care providers will focus on traumatic brain injury and concussion in youth and young adult athletes.  The keynote speaker is Mike Smith, an ETSU alumnus and former NFL head coach who was recently named defensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.  The event includes sessions defining concussion, concussion case reviews and scenarios, return to play and return to learn guidelines for injured athletes, and hands-on skill sessions.  Registration fees apply.  Registration is available at www.etsu.edu/cme.  Contact: Continuing Medical Education, 439-8027. 

Guest Artist Recital: Kuan Cheng Lu
Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m., Brown Hall auditorium
At the age of 23, violinist Kuan Cheng Lu was selected to join the New York Philharmonic.  An audience favorite, Lu will mark his third visit to ETSU with a performance of works by Bach, Beethoven, Ravel and Saint-Saëns, accompanied by pianist Dr. Chih-Long Hu of the ETSU music faculty.  Admission: $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and free for students with ID.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Guest Lecture and Recital: “Confronting Inertia” by Dr. John Adler
Feb. 29, 11:30 a.m., Mathes Hall auditorium
Dr. John Adler’s “Confronting Inertia” CD features all new works, many incorporating improvisation in a classical context, for trumpet and piano or electronics.  This lecture and recital will introduce the increasingly accessible and rapidly growing world of electronically enhanced music-making.  Specific equipment and software will be discussed and demonstrated.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Guest Artist/Faculty Recital: “Is it Live … or is it Memorex?”
Feb. 29, 7:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 105 S. Boone St., Johnson City
Guest trumpeter Dr. John Adler will join ETSU’s Dr. David Champouillon (trumpet) in a recital of classical and jazz standards, along with cutting-edge music for trumpet and electronics.  They will be accompanied by organist Laura Champouillon and pianist Jeri Paolini.  Contact: Department of Music, 439-4276. 

Registration for Paleo-Camp
Early registration is under way for the summer Paleo-Camp at the ETSU and General Shale Natural History Museum and Visitor Center.  Paleo-Camp is designed for children interested in paleontology, science, art and nature and allows children to explore paleontology in the field and lab at the five-acre Gray Fossil Site.  Four one-week sessions are scheduled for two age groups (first-second grades and third-fifth grades).  Regular registration is $185; discounts are available for children of museum members and ETSU faculty/staff ($165).  Reservation forms and camp schedules are available at www.etsu.edu/naturalhistorymuseum.  Contact: Natural History Museum, 439-3659 or info@grayfossilsite.com

“Inhabitants: Creatures of Imagined Worlds”
Continuing through Feb. 5, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Slocumb Galleries, Ball Hall
This national juried exhibition features works by 32 artists from throughout the U.S. and is presented by the Department of Art and Design in partnership with the Honors College.  It is a celebration of aliens, monsters, robots and creatures of all kinds that reside within the imaginations of the artists’ minds.  Curators are Marty Henley and Kevin C. Reaves of the Department of Art and Design.  An “ArtIfact” lecture will be held in conjunction with the exhibit on Feb. 4 at 6 p.m.  In addition to the regular hours above, Slocumb offers extended hours until 6 p.m. on Thursdays and other times by appointment.  Contact: Slocumb Galleries, 483-3179 or contrera@etsu.edu

“Art by the Exceptional Child: Revisited”
Continuing through Feb. 9, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, Reece Museum
As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, the Reece Museum presents this exhibit that was originally organized and shown in 1969 in conjunction with the Tennessee Department of Education.  It featured art created by special needs children from across the United States.  The popularity of the initial exhibit led to the creation of a second show, with both touring the country for several years in the early 1970s.  This retrospective exhibit contains a selection of works from the original shows, as well as promotional material, newspaper clippings and correspondence that offer a glimpse into how the display was organized, exhibited and received.  Contact: Reece Museum, 439-4392. 

The Works of John Grant
Continuing through March 7, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, Multicultural Center, D.P. Culp Center
This selection of wood and stone carvings by Cherokee artist John Grant is the first exhibit in the display area of the newly opened Multicultural Center at ETSU.  Grant, a U.S. Air Force veteran and former federal police officer with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, uses a variety of materials, and his carvings sometimes take him well over 100 hours each to complete.  Contact: Multicultural Center, 439-4844. 

“Reading Appalachia: Voices from Children’s Literature”
Continuing through March 25, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, Reece Museum
Museum visitors can walk through pages of their favorite storybooks in this interactive traveling exhibit from the East Tennessee Historical Society.  Sporting life-size characters from Appalachian children’s books, the exhibit looks at seminal titles from the late 1800s to the present.  Included are clothing and toys from Appalachia, music and hands-on activities.  Children may try on masks of storybook characters and find themselves in a story, or create their own story of childhood set in Appalachia.  Visitors may also hear the voice of old-time storyteller Ray Hicks.  Contact: Reece Museum, 439-4392.

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 Watch ETSU’s PlanIt Calendar for more campus events.  Planning an event? Be sure to enter it into the PlanIt Calendar to let folks know!

 

 

 

 

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