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Appalachian Teaching Project

Center of Appalachian Studies & Services

University of Tennessee

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Using New and Emerging Technologies to Promote Appalachian Tourism

The increased use of smartphones has transformed the way Americans shop, learn, interact, and travel. As a result, cities and tourism stakeholders are adopting new ways to utilize this technology to improve their businesses and the visitor experience.

The 2015 ATP class will examine ways to help small Appalachian communities benefit from this technological revolution. In particular, students will evaluate the use of Near Field Communication (NFC) technologies in promoting local businesses and tourism resources. NFC is a technology that allows smartphones to retrieve or exchange information with posters, tags, or other phones over distances of less than four inches. By touching a smartphone to an NFC tag or device, users can make purchases, download information, or connect to a website.

ATP students will work with stakeholders in Johnson County, Tennessee, to test these technologies by developing a network of "smart markers" for the town to convey information about local sites and businesses. Using lessons learned from this case study, students will develop recommendations and guidelines to help similar communities develop their own systems.

2015 ATP Proposal

University of Tennessee Live Presentation in Washington, D.C.

2015 ATP Final Report

 

Contact Information:

Tim Ezzell, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
Department of Political Science
University of Tennessee
UT Conference Center, Suite 311
Knoxville, TN 37996-4134
Telephone: (865) 974-9036

E-Mail:



Previous Conference Participation:
2014    2013    2012    2011    2010    2009

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