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Storytelling

Communication & Performance

The ETSU Storytelling Institutes are short intensive master classes on particular topics within the field of contemporary storytelling. Established in 1992, ETSU Institute instructors have included many of the best-loved performers and teachers in the storytelling world. ETSU Summer Institutes are a great way for interested students to get a taste of the spirit and energy of the ETSU Storytelling Program.

These popular 3 to 5 day workshops may be attended by anyone--either for university credit or on a non-credit basis. Generally one graduate credit hour is available per institute. In-state tuition is available to those who enroll--no matter the residence of the enrollee; however you must go through the National Storytelling Network Instructional Credit Agreement to receive this special rate.

 

Registration Information

Follow these steps to register.

  1. All participants must fill out the PDF: Registration Form and send it in with your deposit to reserve a place. If you are NOT taking the institute for credit, this and your housing arrangements are is the only steps you have to complete.
  2. If you desire to take an institute for credit, you must either apply as a graduate student in the storytelling program, or register as a non-degree student. This information can be found in the Graduate School website. If you wish to apply for the storytelling program, click here.
  3. After you enroll, you must also register for credit through the university registration system called Goldlink.
  4. Arrange for your housing through the ETSU Housing Office or independently.  (PDF: On-Campus Guest Housing Application)

For more information, contact Dr. Sobol .

To sum up, there are three separate payments that may need to be made for the institutes:

 

  1. Institute fee (this is paid directly to ETSU Storytelling, and serves to pay the Guest Instructor—see Registration Form.) The Non-Credit Institute Fee is higher than the For-Credit Institute Fee because there is no additional tuition fee involved.
  2. Tuition fee (for Graduate Credit--this is paid to ETSU or, for those using the NSN Tuition Agreement for In-State tuition rates, to the National Storytelling Network.
  3. Housing fee (This will not apply if you choose to arrange non-University housing).
Sample Schedule

Day One: 

Noon - 1:00

Registration. The remainder of the Institute will also take place there. Those who have already paid Institute fees in full may arrive around 12:45.

1:00 - 3:45

Introduction & announcements by Institute Director.

Opening Session with Institute Leader (Tapes and resources may be sold throughout all sessions at the discretion of the Institute Leader).

4:00 - 5:45

Informal coaching among participants. Tellers may stay and engage in a session of peer coaching. Each teller will state how much (or little) he/she would like to be coached. Enrollees for credit are required to attend two of the three peer coaching sessions, today, Tues. or Thurs., and telling is required just once.

7:00 – 9:30

Evening session with Institute Leader

Day Two: 

9:00a - 11:45a

Announcements by Institute Director

Morning session by Institute Leader (Timing for all morning and afternoon breaks will vary according to the de­sires of the Institute Leader.)

11:45a - 1:00p

Lunch. Lunch is on your own. Feel free to carpool with others going to nearby eateries and get to know them better during this social time. We ask that everyone please make your lunch plans to insure your return to the meeting room by 12:50 so the session will not be interrupted by late arrivers. Please keep in mind the lunchtime traffic and the delays in getting served at most eating establishments near the noon hour. Feel free to "brown-bag it" and eat in the classroom if you wish.

1:00 - 3:45

Afternoon session with Institute Leader

4:00 - 5:45

Informal coaching among participants (giving the Institute Leader a breather before concert). Tellers may stay and engage in a session of peer coaching. Each teller will state how much (or little) he/she would like to be coached.

5:45 - 7:00

Break and Dinner (on your own) for participants. Volunteers for helping with the concert should be at the auditorium by 6:45.

7:30 - 9:00

Concert

Day Three

9:00a - 11:45a

Announcements by Institute Director

Morning session by Institute Leader including discussion of previous evening's concert

11:45a - 1:00p

Lunch. Lunch is on your own. Feel free to carpool with others go­ing to nearby eateries and get to know them better during this social time. We ask that everyone please make your lunch plans to insure your return to the meeting room by 12:50 so the session will not be interrupted by late arrivers. Please keep in mind the lunchtime traffic and the delays in getting served at most eating establishments near the noon hour. Feel free to "brown-bag it" and eat in the classroom if you wish.

1:00- 6:30

Open Afternoon

Participants may wish to attend the Teller-in-Residence Program at the International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough.

Carpooling is encouraged. Tickets have been pre-ordered.

Participants may also wish to do a peer coaching session this afternoon, instead of going to Jonesborough.

6:30 - 9:00

LIGHT PICNIC SUPPER and Evening Participant Olio

Day Four:

9:00a - 11:45a

Announcements by Institute Director

Morning session by Institute Leader (Timing for all morning and afternoon breaks will vary according to the de­sires of the Institute Leader.)

11:45a - 1:00p

Lunch. Lunch is on your own. Feel free to carpool with others go­ing to nearby eateries and get to know them better during this social time. We ask that everyone to please make your lunch plans to insure your return to the meeting room by 12:50 so the session will not be interrupted by late arrivers. Please keep in mind the lunchtime traffic and the delays in getting served at most eating establishments near the noon hour. Feel free to "brown-bag it" and eat in the classroom if you wish.

1:00 - 3:45

Afternoon session with Institute Leader

4:00 - 5:45

Informal coaching among partici­pants. Tellers may stay and engage in a session of peer coaching. Each teller will state how much (or little) he/she would like to be coached.

5:45 - 9:30

Open evening

Last day: 

8:50a - 9:00a

Class Photo-Taking. Please arrive early so we can do this quickly and smoothly.

9:00a -11:45a

Announcements by Institute Director

Morning session with Institute Leader

11:45a - Noon

Institute evaluations and good-byes

Past Instructors

2016 – Heather Forest, Andy Offutt Irwin, Clare Muirrean Murphy

2015 - Kim Weitkamp, Shonaleigh Cumbers

2014 - Doug Lipman, Lyn Ford

2013 - Elizabeth Ellis

2012 - Kim Weitkamp, David Novak, Dolores Hydock, Charlotte Blake-Alston

2011 - Antonio/Milbre, Patrick Ball, Eth-Noh-Tec/ Hannah Harvey

2010 - Antonio Rocha/Milbre Burch, Rafe Martin

2009--Diana Wolkstein, Bill Harley, Judith Black, Linda Goss

2008--Connie Reagan Blake & National Storytelling Conference Institute

2007--Jim May, Umoja Festival Institute featuring: Jon Spelman, Antonio Sacre, La'Ron Williams

2006 - Nancy Donoval, Gayle Ross, Umoja Festival Institute featuring: Joseph Bruchac, Walker Calhoun and Family, Gayle Ross, Gene Tagaban, Dovie Thomason

2005 - Jennifer Armstrong, Heather Forest, Diane Ferlatte
Umoja Festival Institute: Charlotte Blake-Alston, Diane Ferlatte,
Linda Goss, In the Spirit, Baba Jamal Koram, Sparky & Rhonda Rucker,
Mary Carter Smith

2004 - Milbre Burch, Carol Birch, Elizabeth Ellis, Dovie Thomason

2003 - Donald Davis, Willy Claflin, Odds Bodkin

2002 - Jay O'Callahan, Laura Simms, Loren Niemi

2001 - Bill Mooney, Nancy Kavanaugh, Bobby and Sherry Norfolk

2000 - Roger Petersen, Susan Klein, David Novak

1999 - Kendall Haven, Mary Hamilton, Syd Lieberman

1998 - Ed Stivender, Barbara Mc-Bride Smith, Rex Ellis

1997 - Charlotte Blake-Alston, Doug Lipman, Carmen Deedy

1996 - Rafe Martin, Elizabeth Ellis, Gay Ducey

1995 - Dan Keding, Roger Petersen, Jackie Torrence

1994 - Jackson Gillman, Connie Regan-Blake and Barbara Freeman, Donald Davis

1993 - David Holt, Diane Ferlatte, Heather Forest

1992 - Ed Stivender, Judith Black, David Novak

Summer 2017

STOR 5830-050 Storytelling Institute: Kendall Haven

July 10-14, 2017

Your Brain on Story: Using Story Science to Improve Storytelling

INSTITUTE DESCRIPTION: When we tell a story, everything we hope for and care about happens in the mind of the audience. If our story is to teach, inspire, engage, persuade, or even just entertain; if it is to create meaning, empathy, or new insights; it all happens in—and only in—the mind of the audience. Yes, stories can change lives. However, available research shows that less than 1% of the stories that reach you accomplish those Herculean feats. What gives those few stories power over human minds? Based on recent research findings and experiments from the neural science of story we have discovered that the human brain has been evolutionarily hardwired to make sense, to understand, and to create meaning in specific story terms and in specific story forms. In this institute we will examine and master each of the elements of that natural neural story form. We will explore exactly how human brains process, understand, make sense of, and remember—and how to adjust and control our own stories to take full advantage of that knowledge. In this institute we will all master the practical meaning and application of story science information.

Guest Instructor Bio:

Kendall Haven

KENDALL HAVEN

Kendall@KendallHaven.com

www.KendallHaven.com

The only West Point graduate to turn professional storyteller, Kendall Haven also holds a graduate degree in Oceanography. Now a performing master storyteller, and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Stanford University for story and communications research, Haven has, for over 30 years, led the research effort for the National Storytelling Network (formerly NAPPS & NSA) and International Storytelling Center into effective story structure and into the process of story-based influence and persuasion.

An internationally recognized Subject Matter Expert on the cognitive and neuro-science of story, Haven helped create the study of the Neuroscience of Story and created the first detailed, tested model of dynamic story architecture that accounts for the neurology of how narrative material is processed, understood, remembered, and recalled in a receiver’s mind. His two seminal works, Story Proof and Story Smart, have revolutionized our understanding of the neural and science aspects of effective story structure and present his major advances in story and narrative theory: the Neural Story Net, the Make Sense Mandate, the Eight Essential Elements, Motive Matching, and the first explicit Story Influence Model.

Haven was the only working storyteller recruited as part of the recent U.S. Department of Defense DARPA research program to explore the cognitive neurology of how stories exert influence. He serves as a story consultant to departments in various U.S. governmental science agencies (Navy, EPA, NASA, NOAA, and NPS) and to the Singapore Armed Forces as well as with numerous corporations, nonprofits, and educational organizations and was selected as a featured presenter at the 2013 and 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival. Haven has published 34 books of and on stories and storytelling and has won 20 major awards for his writing and performance storytelling.

For further information contact the ETSU Storytelling Program at 423-439-7601 and

 

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