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Department of History

College of Arts & Sciences

Catalog Course Listings 

HIST 1110 World History to 1500: A general survey of the cultural, religious, political, and social development of major world civilizations from their beginnings to c.1500.

HIST 1120 World History Since 1500: A general survey of the cultural, religious, political, and social development of major world civilizations from 1500 to the present.

HIST 3010  Beginnings of America: (A) A history of the establishment of European settlements in America and the development of colonies in the 16th and 17th centuries.

HIST 3011  The American Revolution: (A) A study of the origins and development of revolutionary sentiment in 18th century America.

HIST 3012 Women in Early American Politics: (A) This course focuses on the political contributions of American women from the colonial period through the end of the 19th century.

HIST 3013 Espionage and Treason in the Early US: (A) Introduces students to the use of spies, covert operations, in addition to the circumstances under which treason was identified and prosecuted in the Early Republic (broadly defined as the period from the American Revolution through the Civil War).

HIST 3020 American, Ethnic, and Cultural History: (A) A study of selected minority and ethnic groups in the United States with attention to geographical origin, migration patterns, and their impact on and adaptation to American culture.

HIST 3030 Antebellum America:(A)

HIST 3035 (RODP) Technology and Culture in American History: (A) Prerequisites: Completion of HIST 2010 and/or HIST 2020 is strongly suggested, but not required. This course describes and analyzes the history of technology in the United States from the colonial period to the present.

HIST 3040 The Old South: (A) An advanced course in the history of the South from colonial times to the Civil War, with emphasis upon economic, social, and political developments, including the slavery controversy.

HIST 3041 History of Southern Appalachians: (A) A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in southern Appalachia from settlement to the 20th century.

HIST 3042 The West in the Life of the Nation: (A) A study of westward expansion and the impact of the frontier on American institutions from the Old Southwest and Northwestern frontiers to the Pacific Coast.

HIST 3067 The American Civil War Era: (A) A general survey of the American Civil War Era designed both for history and non-history majors. It deals with some of the major questions in American history from 1848 through 1877, such as why did the Civil War occur, why did the North win, how did the war impact the home fronts, was Reconstruction revolutionary, and what is the meaning of the Civil War in modern America.

HIST 3070  Emergence of the United States,1865-1920: (A) A study of the rise of big business, big labor, big government, and the agrarians in the late 19th century, the Progressive Movement, World War I, League of Nations, and the Depression.

HIST 3071 The South Since 1865: (A) A study of the recent South with special attention to its politics, economy, society, culture, and relationship to national history.

HIST 3072 U.S. Presidents to 1900: (A) A historical survey of the presidency and its effects on political, legal, and cultural developments in the U.S. from the Constitutional Convention of 1787, through the Civil War.

HIST 3080  Recent United States, 1920-1948: (A) A study of the New Deal, World War II, the significant changes in American society since the war, and the exercise of great power status in international affairs.

HIST 3090 Social, Cultural and Intellectual History of the U.S. to 1877: (A) A study of selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history from the colonial period to the end of Reconstruction.

HIST 3091 Social, Cultural and Intellectual History of the U.S. Since 1877: (A) A study of selected and representative social, cultural, and intellectual themes in American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 3092 American Popular Culture Since World War II: (A) A historical survey of how television, music, politics, literature, religion, medicine, the internet and other various mediums have shaped and reshaped American culture and the larger world since the end of the second World War.

HIST 3093 Famous Trials in American History: (A) A historical survey of famous trials analyzed through an array of historical factors: legal, literary, sociological, psychological, cultural, economic, political and many other potential connections to society past and present.

HIST 3101 History of Russia to 1917: (E) A study of politics, society, and culture in Russia from Kievan Rus to the end of Tsarism, with emphasis on the latter period.

HIST 3102 History of Russia since 1917: (E) A study of Russia, with emphasis on politics, ideology, culture, and economic development from the collapse of tsarism and the Russian Revolution through the Soviet period and the post-Soviet period, including its successor states.

HIST 3103 East Asia since 1900: (W) The transformation of China and Japan from regional to international economic powers.

HIST 3121 (RODP) England Before 1714: (E) The course traces the history of England from the Anglo-Saxon invasions of the fifth and sixth centuries to the political, religious, and cultural consensus and new economic order achieved in the early eighteenth century. As befits a survey, the course will examine political, cultural, and socio-economic trends, emphasizing those developments which help explain the distinctive liberalism and individualism of English culture, such as the breakdown of feudalism, the Reformation and its Puritan offshoot, the emergence of the common law, and the rise of Parliament.

HIST 3310 Ancient History: (W) A survey of the origins of ancient urban civilization, including the river valley civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia, Israel, and Greece, with emphasis on the development of cultural, religious, political, and social institutions.

HIST 3311 History of Ancient Greece: (E) A study of ancient Greece from its origins in the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic Age, with special emphasis on the political, philosophical, and intellectual ideas which form the basis of Western civilization.

HIST 3312 History of Rome: (E) A survey of ancient Rome from its origins to the 4th century A.D., including the Regal period, the struggle of the Orders, the growth of the republic, Roman institutions, the Roman conquest of Italy, the Fall of the Republic, and the growth of autocracy, adjustments in the Empire, the early Christian church, and the culture of Rome and of its subject peoples.

HIST 3313 Women in the Ancient World: (W) A study of the history and circumstances of women in antiquity, including the cultures of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome.

HIST 3320 Medieval History: (E) Introduction to the study of medieval history from the decline of ancient civilization to the beginning of the Renaissance Emphasis on institutional and cultural development.

HIST 3321 History of Byzantium: (W) This course surveys the social, economic, religious, and political history of the Byzantine, or Later Roman Empire, from the Crisis of the Third Century to the final conquest of Byzantium in 1453 by the Ottoman Empire.

HIST 3322 The Middle Ages: (E) A historical survey of the major developments and events in European history between 950 and 1300 from an interdisciplinary perspective, including state centralization, the twelve-century Renaissance, the origin of the university, scholasticism, gothic art, and a basic political narrative of events.

HIST 3323 The Renaissance: (E) A survey of Europe during its transition from medieval to early modern times, with emphasis on the roots of the Renaissance culture of the fifteenth and the religious upheaval of the sixteenth centuries and their impact on institutions and behavior, including the role of women, family life, popular culture, witchcraft/the occult, and the rise of modern science.

HIST 3330 Main Currents of Early Modern Europe: (E) A study of major forces and events that shaped Europe from the mid-sixteenth century to the French Revolution, the Reformation, and wars of religion, absolutism and constitutionalism, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, and aspects of popular culture (the witchcraft craze, marriage and family life, religion).

HIST 3331 The Enlightenment: (E) A historical survey of the major development and events in European history from 1650-1800 from an interdisciplinary perspective, including the philosophes, the history of science, the age of Revolutions, early feminism, the Atlantic World, and art.

HIST 3340 Modern Europe: (E) A study of the 19th century origins of modern Europe, the development of the European industrial economy and society, diplomatic developments, and the nature of the balance of power system, Europe and the two World Wars, and the development of post-World War II Europe.

HIST 3350 England to 1714: (E) A survey of English history from the Roman period to the 18th century. The course will examine the main themes of England's heritage—Christianity, medieval monarchy, common law, the Tudors—with considerable attention given to how men and women lived, worked, prayed, studied, and enjoyed life.

HIST 3351 England, 1714-Present: (E) A study of British history from 1688 to the present with primary attention directed to the political, economic, and social changes that led the nation from an agrarian and aristocratic kingdom to an industrial and democratic state in the 20th century.

HIST 3352 History of Scotland: (E) This course offers a brief yet encompassing chronological overview of key patterns of change throughout Scotland as well as in the lives, habitations and wars of the Picts, Celts, Scots, Angles and Britons within those lands and over migrations from the Highlands to Appalachian regions, including Scotland's central role in Enlightenment thought and contributions to the development of many modern academic disciplines and technologies.

HIST 3380  Modern Germany: (E) A study of the causes and consequences of German unification, the Bismarkian period, the Wilhelminian Age, Weltpolitik and World War I, the Weimar Republic, Hitler and the Nazi Era, and World War II and its aftermath. Emphasis will be placed on political, economic, social, and diplomatic developments.

HIST 3410 Introduction to Historical Methods:  An introductory survey of historical methods and thinking, including consideration of the philosophy of history, historiography, historical research, historical sources, and the writing of history.

HIST 3510 Coal Mining in Appalachia: History and Current Issues: (A) Explores the history of coal mining in Appalachia from cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental perspectives.

HIST 3710 A Survey of the Middle East: (W) A survey of the land, people, and problems of the Middle East from ancient times to the modern period.

HIST 3720 History of Africa: (W) An introduction to the history of the entire African continent from earliest times to the present. Primary emphasis is placed on the achievements of Africans rather than those of foreigners in Africa.

HIST 3730 Colonial Latin America: (W) A study of the colonial period and independence movements with emphasis upon colonial and early national institutions that are of significance for understanding the peculiar mix of reaction and revolution visible in contemporary Latin America.

HIST 3731 Modern Latin America: (W) A study of the national development of several Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Cuba, and Brazil) to show some of the dramatic differences, as well as some of the common features of Latin American social, economic, and political structures today.

HIST 3732 History of Mexico: (W) This upper-division survey examines the course of Mexico's history from national independence in 1821 through to the present day with emphasis on the 1910 revolution, considering its cultural and institutional impact by analyzing its effects on shaping national identity.

HIST 3735 The Modern Caribbean: (W) The course examines the history of the Caribbean from the late eighteenth century to the modern day with an emphasis upon the twentieth century. It surveys the social and political landscape of the region to provide insight into the lives, challenges, triumphs, and contributions made by Caribbean people.

HIST 3740 History of Asia: (W) A survey of Asian history from earliest times which stresses the formation and development of the long-lived political cultures of China and Japan, including their strategies for protecting their national sovereignty.

HIST 3801 Environmental History: (W) A historical survey of how people organized their lives within specific ecological systems, how they understood and explained their natural world, and how they reshaped their environment according to their human needs.

HIST 3811 (RODP) U.S. Military and Naval History: (A) Prerequisites: Completion of HIST 2010 and HIST 2020 is suggested, but not required. This course describes and analyzes the history of American military policy from the colonial period to the present. It focuses on the creation of American military institutions, the genesis of policy-making, the maintenance of civilian control over the military, the conduct of war, the interrelationship between foreign policy and military policy, and the influence of American society upon the armed forces as social institutions.

HIST 3880 (RODP) Renaissance and Reform Europe:(E)

HIST 3900 African-American History to 1877: (A) African-American History to 1877 is a survey course which explores the political, economic, social, and cultural experiences of African-Americans, from their African roots through the Reconstruction period in America. The course will emphasize the struggle for equality along with the collective and individual contributions of African-Americans to United States and world culture.

HIST 3901 African-American History Since 1877: (A) African American History Since 1877 is a survey course which explores the political, economic, social and cultural experiences of African Americans, from United States Reconstruction to the present. The course emphasizes the Civil Rights movement, along with the struggles and achievements of African Americans.

HIST 3902 The Great Debates in African American History: (A) A historical survey and examination of several crucial and ongoing debates in African American history from slavery to the present.

HIST 3910 History of Christianity: (W) A survey of the history of the Christian movement, from the early Church to the diverse expressions of Christianity in the modern world.

HIST 3911 Ancient Religions: (W) A study of the origins, development, and function of religion in the ancient world of the Middle east, the Indian subcontinent, Greece and Rome. The course will cover the religions of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Greece and Rome, as well as Gnosticism, Jainism, and Zoroastrianism.

HIST 3912 Ancient Israel and Modern Scholarship: (W) This course provides a survey and explanation of the approximately last two hundred years of research into the history of Ancient Israel.

HIST 3913 The History of Buddhism: (W) This course surveys the background, origins, and development of Buddhism, from antiquity to modern times, including general religious and cultural background, the historical Buddha, the development of Buddhist schools, and the various Northern and Southern Transmissions by Buddhist teachers, and the ongoing evolution of Buddhist thought and philosophy, as it encountered various national, cultures, and ethnic groups.

HIST 3914 The Historical Jesus and the Early Church: (W) This course will deal with the scholarly question of the "historical Jesus," as versus the "Jesus of faith," and the idea of "Jesus" in the early Christian Church. In the process, we will look at the development of New Testament scholarship, the development of scholarly and historical approaches to New Testament studies, and the gradual evolution of the man Jesus of Nazareth to Jesus Christ, "the Son of God," with the attendant consequences of that change.

HIST 3920 History of Islam: (W) A survey of pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet and his career, the Qur'an, doctrine and ritual, law, Sufism, sects in Islam, the Caliphate, and Islam in the modern world.

HIST 3922 Islamic Empires: (W) A historical survey of the three Muslim Empires or Caliphates, and how Islam expanded to include such vast areas as North Africa, Spain, the Middle East, and Central Asia.

HIST 3923 The Ottoman Empire: (W) A historical survey of the Ottoman Empire from 1300-1918 with an understanding of the prominent political, social, and economical role that such an empire played.

HIST 3924 Women in the Middle East: (W) A historical survey of women's status in Middle Eastern countries with an emphasis on the difference between these countries and the classes of society in these diverse places.

HIST 3926 Gender in American History to 1877: (A) A historical survey that examines and analyzes the political, social, cultural, religious, economic, psychological as well as other aspects of gender and sexuality in American history from the colonial period through Reconstruction.

HIST 3927 Gender in American History Since 1877: (A) A historical survey that examines and analyzes the political, social, cultural, religious, economic, psychological as well as other aspects of gender and sexuality in American history from the late 19th century to the present.

HIST 3930 History of Science: (E) This course allows us to briefly and chronologically review several select eras, events, and people that have significantly shaped the historical development of the physical and life sciences from their supernatural beginnings steeped in magic and religion through the Scientific Revolution in 17th-century Europe and to the mid-20th century.

HIST 3931 History of Medicine: (W) This course allows us to briefly and chronologically review several select eras and events that have significantly shaped the process of healing throughout history. We explore the scientific, social, geographical, political, religious, economic, and public health aspects underlying the challenges presented by various diseases. Key historical changes in defining illness, disease, health, and wellness as well as in developing classification systems of disease are examined from the viewpoints of both healers and sufferers.

HIST 3940 War in the Modern World: (A) A study of war since the 18th century, including how armies reflect the values of a society. Changes in warfare in the modern era, the American way of war strategy, tactics, generalship, weapons, and the impact of war on society.

HIST 3950 Special Topics in History:  Selected topics in the discipline. Can be repeated for credit when content changes.

HIST 3989/3999 Internship/Cooperative Education: 

HIST 4027/5027 The Social and Cultural History of Rock and Roll: Examination of the social and cultural fabric of post-World War II America through the prism of rock music. Focuses on influential rock musicians, as well as important political, business, and social figures and movements. HIST 3092 American Popular Culture Since World War II is recommended.

HIST 4047 The Early Republic:  A study of the Federalist Period, the Jeffersonian Revolution and the War of 1812.

HIST 4077/5077 American History Through Film:  An examination of how film has depicted, influenced and analyzed various political, social, cultural, military, economic, and other issues that have impacted American society from the nation's origin to the present. HIST 3092 American Popular Culture Since World War II is recommended.

HIST 4087 Current Issues in American History:

HIST 4108 Honors Thesis:

HIST 4117 Topics in European History:

HIST 4187 Colloquium in World History:

HIST 4197 China Summer Abroad:

HIST 4247 History of Women in U. S., Settlement to 1945: An investigation of the social, economic, and political roles of women in the life of the nation, from European contact with Native Americans to the end of World War II.

HIST 4257 History of Women in Appalachia: The course investigates the role of women in the history of Appalachia (primarily southern and central Appalachia) from the 18th century to the present. Featured topics are race, ethnicity, religious practice, reform, family and community, and rural life.

HIST 4267/5267 Constitutional History: Congress, the Law & Slavery Upper division seminar that examines debates over slavery with analysis of historical debates over the Constitution and its effects on congressional statutes, national security, race relations, legal battles, and violence from the drafting of the Constitution in 1787 through the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

HIST 4277/5277 Foreign Policy in the Early Republic:  This course deals with developments in Early American diplomacy from the American Revolution through the Civil War.

HIST 4087/5087 Current Issues in American History:  Examines recent (post-1980) social, political and cultural American events and people. HIST 3080 Recent United States History 1920-Present is recommended as a prerequisite for this course.

HIST 4287/5287 Topics in American History:  Topics in American History challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in a particular region or time period. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4117/5117 Topics in European History: Topics in European history challenge advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in this area. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Repeatable for credit, maximum of 9 hours.

HIST 4297/5297 Topics in World History: Topics in world history challenge advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in this area. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 hours.

HIST 4317/5317 Topics in Comparative American History: Topics in Comparative American History challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working on multiple geographic areas or time periods. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 hours.

HIST 4327 Expansion of Europe Overseas, Since 1492 Prerequisites: HIST 1120. A study of European expansion and its impact on the modern world.

HIST 4337/5337 Topics in Comparative European History: Topics in Comparative European History challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore issues related to multiple nations, regions, or cultures across the continent. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4347/5347 Topics in Comparative World History: Topics in Comparative World History challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore issues related to multiple nations, regions, or cultures across the world. Focused on writing skills, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4357/5357 Colloquium in American History: Colloquium in American history challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in this area. Focused on oral communication skills, these courses enable students to discuss academic literature, communicate research topics, and present relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Course repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4367/5367 Colloquium in European History: Colloquium in European history challenges advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in this area. Focused on oral communication skills, these courses enable students to discuss academic literature, communicate research topics, and present relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4387 History of the Holocaust: A study of the background and origins of the Holocaust, including the legacy of anti-Semitism in Christian Europe and the emergence of racial anti- Semitism, the impact of World War I, Hitler's ideology, the racial ideas of the Nazi state. Emphasis will also be put on the decision for and implementation of the Final Solution, with emphasis on the perpetrators, victims, and bystanders, as well as how the initially limited Nazi killings expanded into the Holocaust as we know it. Finally, the meaning and possible uniqueness of the Holocaust will be explored.

HIST 4187/5187 Colloquium in World History: Colloquiums in world history challenge advanced undergraduate and graduate students to explore subjects reflecting the revolving research and teaching interests of faculty working in this area. Focused on developing oral communication skill, these courses enable students to evaluate academic literature, develop research topics, and construct relevant historical arguments in a specific area of advanced study. Repeatable for credit, maximum 9 credits.

HIST 4417 Residency I: Methods of Teaching History Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Content and methods of teaching history and social studies with emphasis in secondary education. This course earns education credit only and does not meet requirements for a major or minor in history or the MAT degree. Must be taken the fall semester prior to Residency II (student teaching).

HIST 4427/547 Public History: Theory and Practice Public History: Theory and Practice introduces students to the profession of Public History, its theoretical background, and the practical requirements of its many sub-fields.

HIST 4670 (RODP) Civil War and Reconstruction Prerequisites: There are not any prerequisites, but completion of History 2010 is recommended. This course is a study of the events leading to the sectional crisis that resulted in the Civil War (1861-1865), the four years of war, and Reconstruction through 1877. Students will examine the development of the Southern plantation-based economy in contrast to the industrialized North, and the contest for national power as the United States expanded west adding new territories and states during the antebellum years. Major attention is given to the struggle over the issue of the expansion of slavery into these new lands. The social, economic, cultural, political, and military aspects of the struggle are studied in order to gain an analytical understanding of the causes, course and results of the war and its impact on the changing roles of all Americans including the changing roles of women and blacks in American society. The course examines the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation and subsequent freedom for African Americans (via the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution) up to the removal of Federal troops from the South in 1877.

HIST 4717 Modern Middle East, 1800 – Present: A study of the Middle East from Napoleon through Khomeini, with emphasis on modernization trends and Islamic responses.

HIST 4727 Modern Africa: An advanced, in-depth examination of African social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual history since about 1880, with special emphasis on the reestablishment of African independence. The principal focus of the class may vary.

HIST 4740 Seminar in China Studies: The seminar is necessary to allow the student to create a project that will integrate the student's work in the courses of the Minor in China Studies, including the language and study abroad option with its in-country research opportunity. The seminar is multidisciplinary, using the methodologies of History and Political Science.

HIST 4827 America in the 1960s: The domestic history of the United States during the 1960s, with emphasis on the era's social and cultural forces Civil Rights—Martin Luther King, Jr, Malcolm X, the Black Power Movement; Social Policy—John F. Kennedy's "New Frontier", Lyndon B. Johnson's "Great Society." The impact of Vietnam and 1968 on the home front, antiwar protests, the counterculture, student rights, modern feminism, environmentalism, and the popular music and literature of the decade.

HIST 4837 American Women Since World War II: The 1950s, Betty Friedan's 1963 groundbreaking study, The Feminine Mystique, birth control, Roe v Wade, the origins of protest movements, women's liberation, defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, and the rise of radical and conservative feminism.

HIST 4847 American Sports, 20th Century to Present: An interdisciplinary study of sport in its historical context: the formation and evolution of various sports, including their economic, political, legal, gender, racial, and sexual aspects, as well as their treatment in popular literature and films.

HIST 4900 Independent Study: The Independent Study option is designed for students who would like to pursue study in areas of history not covered in the department's curriculum. Students are expected to work independently, but under the supervision of a faculty member. Students desiring to use this option must prepare for appropriate signatures, a written application with the faculty which describes course objectives, research methods (including reading list), requirements for presentation of findings of such independent study, anticipated date for completion of all requirements, and method of faculty's evaluation of the independent study project.

HIST 4910 Survey of the Modern World: A recapitulation and synthesis of the main themes of modern history designed to enable majors and minors to acquire a reasonable overview of the past.

HIST 4927 World War II in Europe:  A study of the background, origins, progress, and consequences of World War II in Europe. Emphasis will be placed not only on political, diplomatic, and military aspects of the war, but also on its broader social, economic, technological, and ideological ramifications.

HIST 4937 World War II in the Pacific: A study of the origins, course and consequences of World War II in the Pacific. Emphasis will be placed not only on the political, diplomatic, and military aspects of the war but also on the racial, technological, and ideological ramifications. The course will begin with the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in 1937 and end with the beginning of the Cold War and the rebuilding of Japan.

HIST 4957 Topics in History: A series of special interest subjects will be offered under this title on the basis of student interest and faculty capability. The course may be repeated.

(A): American; (W): World; (E): European

 

 

 

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