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Film Studies Minor

Department of Literature and Language

Schedule

 

Fall Semester 2017

ENGL 3290-001
Intro to Film
"As good a way as any towards understanding what a film is trying to say to us is to know how it is saying it” (André Bazin). This course serves as an introduction to the study of film, providing students with a basic set of tools for analyzing moving images in order to learn how films communicate meaning. We will look at the basic components of film style – from mise-en-scène through cinematography to editing and sound—and we will consider different principles of narration as well as the construction of non-narrative films.

ENGL 3290-900
Introduction to Film Studies
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1020 or equivalent. “As good a way as any towards understanding what a film is trying to say to us is to know how it is saying it” (André Bazin). This course serves as an introduction to the study of film in the way Bazin describes. The course provides students with a basic set of tools for analyzing film. For this purpose, we will break down the complex processes of filmmaking in order to understand the many different aspects that determine the meaning of a finished shot, scene, or film. We will look at the basic components of film style – from mise-en-scène through cinematography to editing and sound – and we will consider different principles of narration as well as the construction of non-narrative films. We will also familiarize ourselves with the basic terminology for film analysis, and we will explore the relation between film form and culture in selected case studies.

ENGL 3350-200
Film History
An overview of the history of film from 1895 to the present. This course is required for film studies minors and is foundational to understanding the discipline.

ENGL 4290-200
Film Genres: Horror
This course will approach the study of film through a consideration of genre, specifically that of horror. We will consider the social, cultural, and political dimensions of horror films as we analyze changing aesthetic conventions, sub-genres, and cultural concerns over the course of film history. "Film Genres" may be repeated for credit when content varies.

ENGL 4340-200
Topics in Film: Food and Film
This course explores themes about food in American and international cinema, with special attention to the social, cultural, and historical context of food as depicted in film. Students will consider the ways in which cultural issues regarding national, ethnic, and gender identity have presented the many roles that food plays in our lives. Films will include, among others, Waitress, Eat Drink Man Woman, The Angel’s Share, The Wedding Banquet, Like Water for Chocolate, Babette's Feast, Big Night, The Hundred Foot Journey, Chocolat, and Sideways.

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