Priscilla B. Wyrick

Professor Emerita, Department of Biomedical Sciences


Teaching Interests:

Bacterial cell structure / function; bacterial virulence, pathogenesis and infectious diseases, especially of facultative and obligate intracellular pathogens; inflammation and mucosal immunity.


Research Interests

Chlamydia trachomatis Pathogenesis

Bacterial Pathogeneis


Dimorphic fungal diseases

Research- In Depth 

Priscilla B.Wyrick

Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology - 1980

Fellow, American Assoc. for Advancement of Science - 2003

President, Chlamydia Basic Research Society - 2005-2007

Honorary Doctorate Veterinary Medicine, University of Zurich – 2011 

Contact Information:

Lab Location:
Rooms 3-24
VA Bldg. 119


Tel: (423) 439-2411 or (423) 439-8079
Fax: (423) 439-8044
e-mail:  or


Mailing Address
Department of Biomedical Sciences
J.H. Quillen College of Medicine
Box 70579, VA#1 – Room 1-41
Johnson City, TN 37614

For Federal Express: Carl Jones Bldg, VA#1-Room 1-41
Dogwood Avenue, MOUNTAIN HOME, TN 37684

 

 

Lab Members

Education and Training:

1963 -- B.S.,  Medical Technology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
1967 -- M.S.,  Bacteriology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
1971 -- Ph.D., Bacteriology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
1971-1973 --   Medical Research Council, Scientific Staff Fellow, National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London, England


Professional Background:

1973 – 2000 --Assistant, Associate Professor, and Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill

May 1, 2000 - 2012 -- Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University;


Research Support:


30 years of NIH R01 funding


Selected Publications:


1. Wyrick, P.B., J. Choong, C.H. Davis, S.T. Knight, M.O. Royal, A.S. Maslow, and C.R. Bagnell. 1989. Entry of genital C. trachomatis into polarized human epithelial cells. Infect. Immun. 57:2378-2389.

2. Wyrick, P.B., C.H. Davis, S.T. Knight, J. Choong, J.E. Raulston, and N. Schramm. 1993. In vitro human epithelial cell culture system for studying the pathogenesis of Chlamydia trachomatis. Sex. Trans. Dis. 20:248-256.

3. Tam, J.E., C.H. Davis, and P.B. Wyrick. 1994. Expression of recombinant DNA introduced into C. trachomatis by electroporation. Can. J. Microbiol. 40:583-591.

4. Schramm, N., C.R. Bagnell, and P.B. Wyrick. 1996. Vesicles containing C. trachomatis Serovar L2 remain above pH6 within HEC-1B cells. Infect. Immun. 64:1208-1214.

5. Dessus-Babus, S., S.T. Knight, and P.B. Wyrick. 2000. Chlamydial infection of polarized cells induces PMN chemotaxis but the cytokine profile varies between disseminating and non-disseminating strains. Cell. Micro. 2(4):317-327.

6. Davis, C.H., J.E. Raulston, and P.B. Wyrick. 2002. Protein Disulfide Isomerase, a Component of the Estrogen Receptor Complex, Is Associated with Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar E Attached to Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells. Infect. Immun. 70(7):3413-3418.

7. Guseva, N.V., S. Dessus-Babus, C.G. Moore, J.D. Whittimore, and P.B. Wyrick. 2007.Differences in Chlamydia trachomatis seovar E growth rate in polarized endometrial andendocervical epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional culture. Infect. Immun. 75 (2):553-564.

8. Hall, J.V., M. Schell, S. Dessus-Babus, C.G. Moore, J. D. Whittimore, M. Sal, B. D. Dill, and P.B. Wyrick. 2011. The multifaceted role of estrogen in enhancing Chlamydia trachomatis infection in polarized human endometrial epithelial cells. Cell. Micro., 1-17. doi:j.1462-5822.2011.01608.

9. Rank, Roger G., J. Whittimore, A. K. Bowlin, ans P.B. Wyrick. 2011. In vivo ultrastructural analysis of the intimate relationship between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the chlamydial developmental cycle. Infect. Immun. 79(8):3291-3301. [Hghlight]



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