About the Curriculum

Course requirements
Core course descriptions
Advanced course descriptions

During the first year, all students receive broad-based training in modern biomedical research through a new interdisciplinary core curriculum. The core curriculum is intended to give students the basic knowledge and skills necessary for research in all areas of the biomedical sciences. The "Biomedical Science I-IV" courses cover the basic principals of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology. Students also receive training in communication skills, statistics and scientific ethics.

Students have the opportunity to explore their individual research interests through laboratory rotations. They are encouraged to sample a variety of faculty research programs by participating in rotations across departments.

In the second year and beyond, student choose from a variety of advanced courses that are offered by individual departments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Ph.D. program course requirements

Core curriculum (22 credits) credits
Biomedical Science I - The Molecular Organization of Cells 3
Biomedical Science II - Gene Expression and Regulation 3
Biomedical Science III - Cellular Anatomy and Physiology 3
Biomedical Science IV - Cell and organ Interactions 3
Biometry and Biomedical Computing I 3
Scientific Communication I 1
Scientific Communication II 1
Introduction Biomedical Research 1
Research Laboratory Rotations 3
Scientific Ethics 1
Advanced electives (3 advanced courses, ) 9
Guided electives (two departmental seminar courses) 4
Dissertation research and other electives 25
Total 60

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Core Course

BIOM 6010 Biomedical Science I Molecular Organization of Cells (3 credits) The first in a four-course multi-disciplinary sequence that describes the fundamentals of modern biomedical research necessary for all biomedical science graduate students. The course presents a foundation in modern biochemistry, cell and molecular biology. Topics include chemical foundations, protein structure and function, nucleic acids and the genetic code, biomembranes, recombinant DNA and genomics and genetic analysis in cell biology. (fall semester).

BIOM 6020 Biomedical Science II - Gene Expression and Regulation (3 credits) The second in a four-course multi-disciplinary sequence that describes the fundamentals of modern biomedical research necessary for all biomedical science graduate students. The course covers the essential aspects of molecular and developmental biology. Topics include: the structure of genes and chromosomes, DNA repair, DNA replication and recombination, RNA processing, the cell cycle and genetic control of development.(fall semester)

BIOM 5030/6030 Biomedical Science III - Cellular Anatomy and Physiology (3 credits) The third in a four-course multi-disciplinary sequence that describes the fundamentals of modern biomedical research necessary for all biomedical science graduate students. This course covers topics involved in building and fueling cells including cell transport, cell energetics, protein sorting and cell motility and shape. (spring semester)

BIOM 6040 Biomedical Science IV Cell and Organ Interactions (3 credits) The fourth in a four-course multi-disciplinary sequence that describes the fundamentals of modern biomedical research necessary for all biomedical science graduate students. Topics include extracellular signaling, hormones and receptors, second messengers and intracellular signaling, nerve cell functions, cell interactions in development and cancer. (spring semester)

BIOM 6210 Scientific Communication I (1 credit) Taken by all first year doctoral students in the Fall. Students will attend seminars by external speakers, faculty and senior students. Students will critique presentations and discuss presentation techniques and style, slide preparation, etc. (fall semester)

BIOM 6220 Scientific Communication II (1 credit) Taken by all first year doctoral students in the spring. Students will make oral presentations on topics of interest and learn effective techniques for oral and written communication of scientific data. (spring semester)

BIOM 5110/6110 Introduction to Biomedical Research (1 credit) This course will introduce students to the current research of the faculty of the College of Medicine. Departments and interdisciplinary research groups will present a series of short talks describing the research programs of the faculty. Students will meet in different locations and tour the laboratories and facilities. A written report on the scientific topics is required of each student. (fall semester)

BIOM 6120 Laboratory Rotations (3 credits) A series of three to five laboratory rotations in which students gain a understanding of the research problems currently under investigation and the techniques employed in selected laboratories. Students select faculty whose research or research techniques is of particular interest and participate in four to six week long rotations involving hands-on laboratory experience and participation in laboratory discussions and other activities. (spring semester and arranged)

BIOM 5300 /6300 Scientific Ethics (1 credit) Lecture and group discussion of cases relating to contemporary issues of ethics and integrity in scientific research. Topics include: Scientific integrity, mentoring, scientific record keeping, authorship and peer review, use of animals in research, use of humans in research, conflicts of interest, ownership of data, intellectual property and issues relevant to genetic technology. (spring semester)

Advanced departmental course descriptions

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