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June 30, 2011

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Contact: Brad Lifford

Health Care Hero Award winners feted for excellence in research, medical practic e

JOHNSON CITY – Two renowned professors from East Tennessee State University and a widely admired faculty member who passed away earlier this year are among the recipients of the 2011 Health Care Hero Awards presented by the   Business Journal of Tri-Cities Tennessee/Virginia.

Award winners were Dr. Priscilla Wyrick, chair of the Department of Microbiology at ETSU’s James H. Quillen College of Medicine; Dr. Ronald Hamdy, chairholder of the Cecile Cox Quillen Chair of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology; and the late Dr. Tiejian Wu, who was an associate professor of biostatistics and epidemiology in the College of Public Health.

The careers of all three ETSU honorees are marked with distinction in the fields of academic research and medical practice.

Wyrick received the Health Care Heroes Distinguished Service Award for her achievements in microbiological research. She is particularly renowned for her groundbreaking studies of chlamydia. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) have funded her research for 30 consecutive years.

In the past year, Wyrick’s accomplishments were also recognized by colleagues overseas. The University of Zürich, one of the top scientific research centers in Europe, presented Wyrick an honorary doctorate.

Hamdy, a professor of internal medicine, is the director of the ETSU Osteoporosis Center. During the recent annual meeting of the International Society of Clinical Densitometry (ISCD), Hamdy received the ISCD Clinician of the Year Award, presented to an outstanding clinician for distinguished service to the field of densitometry in the areas of publication, education or leadership.

Actively involved in patient care, research and teaching in his main areas of expertise, Hamdy has four books and over 200 articles in medical journals and numerous chapters in textbooks to his credit.

Wu, who also held a faculty appointment in the ETSU Department of Family Medicine, remained steadfast in his pursuit of an NIH research grant even while battling cancer. His project, which aims to cut obesity among high school students, is innovative in using ETSU college students as ambassadors who will go into area high schools to promote supportive peer relationships and positive attitudes in regard to healthy eating habits and physical activity.

Wu designed the project and guided it through the application submission process before he died earlier this year. NIH has since notified the university that the grant was approved at the requested $978,000 funding amount, and Wu’s colleagues in the College of Public Health are moving forward with his research.

Profiles of the magazine’s Health Care Heroes and photos of the awards ceremony will be published in the July edition of the Business Journal.


May 26, 2011

Bowling for Bones was a blast! Click here to read about it in the Johnson City Press.


May 20, 2011

Check out this issue of   News and Neighbor  for an article on Bowling for Bones! (See page 10.)


May 19, 2011

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Contact: Brad Lifford


ETSU Osteoporosis Center holding ‘Bowling for Bones’ to raise awareness of disease

JOHNSON CITY – The East Tennessee State University Osteoporosis Center is making a strike against a disease that will cause about one in two women and up to one in four men over the age of 50 to suffer a broken bone.

The center, working in partnership with the Johnson City Seniors’ Center and Mountainview Lanes, will hold “Bowling for Bones,” an osteoporosis awareness event on Wednesday, May 25, from 1-3:30 p.m. Participants can pair a fun activity – bowling will be $1 per game, plus $1 to rent bowling shoes – with the opportunity to ask questions of an internationally renowned expert on osteoporosis, Dr. Ronald Hamdy, as well as have a bone density screening. May is National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month.

Hamdy, the director of the ETSU Osteoporosis Center, is a professor of internal medicine at ETSU’s James H. Quillen College of Medicine and chairholder of the Cecile Cox Quillen Chair of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine. He recently received a national award in honor of his contributions to the field of clinical densitometry, or bone mass measurement.

Those who attend “Bowling for Bones” are not required to participate in both activities – bowling or bone density scanning – but both have merits for those at risk for osteoporosis. Regular exercise and activity are essential for helping prevent osteoporosis, and a bone density screening is used to diagnose osteoporosis.

The Osteoporosis Center’s mobile bone scan unit will be parked outside Mountainview Lanes, formerly known as Leisure Lanes and located at 613 Leisure Lane in Johnson City. Bone density screenings are quick, painless and non-invasive. They are recommended for men over the age of 70 and all postmenopausal women. Each person screened will have an opportunity to speak with Dr. Hamdy and his staff about the results.

Prizes will be awarded to the winning team and the individual bowler with the highest score, as well as the team with the best show of spirit. All participants will be offered calcium-rich snacks, gift bags and information about improving bone health.

To register, call the Johnson City Seniors’ Center at (423) 434-6237. For more information, call the ETSU Osteoporosis Center at (423) 439-8091, or send e-mails to   .


May 12, 2011

The Associated Press reports on Dr. Hamdy's ISCD Clinician of the Year award!


May 5, 2011

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Contact: Brad Lifford 


Dr. Ronald Hamdy receives national award for contributions to field of clinical densitometry

JOHNSON CITY – Dr. Ronald Hamdy, a professor of internal medicine at East Tennessee State University’s James H. Quillen College of Medicine and chairholder of the Cecile Cox Quillen Chair of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine, has received a national award in honor of his contributions to the field of clinical densitometry.

During a recent annual meeting of the International Society of Clinical Densitometry (ISCD), Hamdy received the ISCD Clinician of the Year Award, presented each year to an outstanding clinician for distinguished service to the field of densitometry in the areas of publication, education or leadership. Clinical densitometry focuses on bone mass measurement and the diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

Hamdy is the longtime medical director of the ETSU Osteoporosis Center, which is located on the first floor of Building 8 on the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center campus. He is actively involved in patient care, research and teaching in his main areas of expertise, which include osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and dementia. He has published extensively, with four books and over 200 articles in medical journals and numerous chapters in medical textbooks to his credit.

Also at the annual meeting, Hamdy was appointed editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Densitometry, the official journal of the ISCD. The journal presents practice-oriented research findings, current clinical techniques and relevant technical information related to the field, and explores new ideas and concepts that can influence the practical clinical management of osteoporosis and other metabolic diseases.

For more information about the ETSU Osteoporosis Center, call (423) 439-8091. The center is on the Web at www.etsu.edu/com/osteoporosiscenter/.


April 5, 2011

Bowling for Bones flyer


March 4, 2011


Coming soon – “Bowling for Bones!”

May is National Osteoporosis Month. To help celebrate this event, the ETSU Osteoporosis Center, Mountainview Lanes, and the Johnson City Senior Center are partnering to present “Bowling for Bones” on May 25, 2011. We’re also celebrating National Senior Health and Fitness Day on May 25th, which presents a great opportunity to go bowling and help prevent osteoporosis at the same time. Stay tuned to for more details!


February 4, 2011
   
Dr. Hamdy appears on Daytime Tri-Cities! Click   here  to watch him discuss osteoporosis awareness with Lynda Fontaine.

Dr. Hamdy with patient.
Dr. Hamdy discussing bone health with a patient at the ETSU Osteoporosis Center.


January 21, 2011

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Contact: Brad Lifford
 

ETSU Osteoporosis Center creates new Web site, algorithm to aid patients and health care providers

JOHNSON CITY – The disease can be silent, but that does nothing to dampen its effects or pervasiveness. Osteoporosis, the condition which debilitates bones and makes them more likely to break, comes with stark realities that Dr. Ronald C. Hamdy knows well.

“Osteoporosis does affect men, but women are especially at risk,” said Hamdy, a professor at East Tennessee State University’s James H. Quillen College of Medicine and chairholder of the Cecile Cox Quillen Chair of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine. “In women who are older than 50, there are more fractures related to osteoporosis than the incidence of breast cancer, heart attacks, strokes, ovarian, and cervical cancer combined.

“And of those women who suffer a fracture, one in five is expected to die within a year.”

Hamdy, the longtime medical director at the ETSU Osteoporosis Center, said better education about the disease among the general population and earlier detection could drastically improve those statistics.

“Osteoporosis is preventable,” Hamdy said, “and it is treatable. There are so many, many cases that go undiagnosed before a fracture occurs. We have more tools and treatment options than ever available to us to treat and manage the disease. But I’m not sure that society on the whole realizes how serious the problem is and how solvable it can be.”

The ETSU Osteoporosis Center, which has long been a regional leader in diagnosing and treating the disease, recently created a new, multi-faceted Web site that offers a blend of online services for patients and health care providers as well as extensive education for all.

Visitors to http://www.etsu.edu/com/osteoporosiscenter/ can learn many facts about osteoporosis, how it is treated, and how it is detected through a bone density scan, or DXA scan – a dual X-ray exam to test bone mineral density that is simple, quick, painless and precise. Patients who go online can find information about making an appointment, learn how to prepare for a DXA scan, and get answers to frequently asked questions, such as precise directions to the Osteoporosis Center, which is located on the first floor of Building 8 on the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center campus. For additional information about the Web site, contact Jennifer Culp, media coordinator, at osteoporosis@etsu.edu. Interested persons can also become a fan of the ETSU Osteoporosis Center on Facebook.

Susan Gray, who is director of the Osteoporosis Center, said much thought and planning went into creating the new Web site.  “We wanted to create something comprehensive that is tailored to the needs of patients who turn to us for help, and for people in the community who have unanswered questions about the disease,” Gray said. “We used patient input in creating the site. We considered which online tools they need to make their experience better, like the ability to easily make an appointment. And there are so many myths and questions about osteoporosis that we wanted to advance general education. Dr. Hamdy is a renowned authority on osteoporosis, and our new Web site makes it easy for visitors to take advantage of his expertise.”

Referring physicians and other health care professionals will also find benefits. Instructions on how to order a bone density scan through the Osteoporosis Center is available, as well as information on the center’s Bone Clubs, which are periodic educational events for health care professionals that are presented by Dr. Hamdy.

Also available is a new aid for physicians that could be a valuable tool in the fight against the disease: an algorithm for the detection and management of osteoporosis. The algorithm and an accompanying paper, recently published in the Southern Medical Journal, functions like a flow chart that can help health care professionals, especially primary care providers, quickly determine a patient’s level of risk for osteoporosis. Risk factors such as age, gender, a history of fractures, smoking, and medications predisposing a person to osteoporosis are among those factors that are grouped and streamlined so a proper course of prevention, disease maintenance, treatment or referral can be followed.

Hamdy and a group of osteoporosis experts created the algorithm with the idea that it be used freely and widely by health care providers. At the Osteoporosis Center Web site, visitors can download a printable version of the algorithm (http://www.etsu.edu/com/osteoporosiscenter/forprofessionals/algorithm.aspx).

“One of the difficulties for physicians when it comes to assessing a patient’s risk for osteoporosis is lack of time – it isn’t a lack of knowledge,” Hamdy said. “Physicians and clinicians are busy and they have several assessment priorities during a routine examination, so we wanted to streamline the process for them where osteoporosis is concerned, so they can make a quick determination as to the best course of action. We think the algorithm can make a significant difference for patients and health care providers.”

For more information about the Osteoporosis Center, call Pam Howell at (423) 439-8091 or send e-mails to howellpb@etsu.edu.


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