Plenary Talks

There will be two plenary talks:

Keynote talks will be given by Professor Carla Savage of North Carolina State University, who will deliver a talk on The Interplay between Problems in Integer Partitions and Permutations, and by Professor Sergey Kitaev, University of Strathclyde, UK, who will give a lecture on Word-Representable Graphs and Permutation Patterns.

Carla D. Savage is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at North Carolina State University, where she has been on the faculty since 1978. Since receiving her Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of Illinois in 1977, she has worked in the areas of parallel algorithms and architectures, Gray codes, Venn diagrams, theory of partitions, and, most recently, enumerative and geometric combinatorics. Her current research involves interconnections between permutation statistics, partition theory, and polyhedral geometry. On February 1, 2013, she was appointed Secretary of the American Mathematical Society.

Professor Kitaev has been at the University of Strathclyde since 2011, in the Computer and Information Sciences Department. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Gothenburg University, Sweden, in 2003, after which he has held visiting positions at the University of Kentucky and at the University of California, San Diego. He joined Reykjavik University as an Assistant Professor in 2005 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2006. Dr Kitaev is a member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society and of the Strathclyde Combinatorics Group, a leading group in the field of permutation patterns. His main research interests are in enumerative (algebraic) combinatorics and combinatorics on words, and also in discrete analysis, graph theory, formal languages and algebra. He is the author of around 100 publications and his book Patterns in Permutations and Words was published by Springer in August 2011. This book (containing more than 800 references) is the first comprehensive source of results and trends in the fast-growing field of patterns in permutations and words.