James Hula

 

Program
M.D.

Hometown
Lebanon, TN

Undergraduate School and Major 
Middle Tennessee State University
Psychology

Specialty/Career Plans
Internal Medicine, MedPeds, Family Medicine, or General Surgery

Extracurricular Activities
Vice President Class of 2010, Intramural sports, Weight Lifting, Outdoor activities (hiking, swimming, camping, etc.,)

Marital Status
Married with two children (ages 8 and 5)

James Hula   
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Why Quillen
There are several aspects of Quillen that attracted me. Having a small class size is awesome. There is great nurturing interaction between professors and students here. Also, QCOM is constantly ranked in the top ten medical school programs for Primary Care in the nation. Not to mention, currently ranked number three nationally for rural medicine. To be among the best programs in the nation makes a powerful statement. Continual top ranking year after year testifies to the level of training that the students here receive. Another reason I desired to be a student here was the school location. I wanted my family to be in a safe area. Johnson City and the Tri-City area are decent sized, but are no where as dangerous as other larger cities.

Being a Quillen Student
Quillen attracts some of the best and brightest people I’ve ever met. It is great to be able to interact with such inspiring persons that are interested in similar goals in life. I love being treated as an equal and as a member of the family. I especially enjoy the encouragement I get from the professors. They not only know my name, they seem to care about what’s going on in my life. The class bonded together quite early and within a few weeks we all knew each other really well. This is really cool because instead of competing against each other, we all come together to help one another.

Juggling School and Family
I have heard it said that medical students have no life. Well, my experience so far has demonstrated that one has as much of a life as one wants. Every profession has certain demands; medical school is no different. I have adjusted certain schedules and priorities, but the most important priority continues to be my family. We still go and enjoy ourselves out on the town and I have not had to find a hole and come up for air every so often either. My wife and daughters bring me great joy and encouragement to continue the pursuit of medicine. The love we share with each other rewards me even when the demands increase.

Life Outside the Classroom
Is of value and is treasured. It is exciting being trained to be a physician, but it is also enjoyable to relax and unwind outside the classroom. Intramural games are awesome times of further class bonding. I like to go for a run and get a work out for about an hour a day. Also, spending time with my family is always fun. There are also a few parks close by and that is also really great as well.

Living In Northeast Tennessee
It is the most beautiful place to be. With the mountains as the landscape, everyday is gorgeous. Even the cloudy, rainy days will not get you down. Everyone is very friendly and willing to help if you need it.

Prior Life
I exchanged a career in construction for one in medicine. I grew up in the construction industry and it offered a stable life, however, I found myself unsatisfied and wanting to do more for others. I feel that there is nothing more that one can do for someone than to help one through sickness by being a vehicle of healing. I had weighed my options and understood that my family could potentially suffer the greatest impact from the decision(s) made. Becoming a part of the Quillen family has been wonderful. We feel blessed and know that this was the right decision for us. The road to make the exchange was difficult, but the journey has been amazing.

Words of Wisdom
If something is of value, it is worth fighting for. Pursue your dreams today because tomorrow is uncertain. Not only is life worth living, but live it to its fullest. You can do anything that you set your mind and heart to do, but if you lack one or the other you may not succeed.