The BIGGEST, BADDEST, COOLEST STARS
CONFERENCE
July 16 - 18, 2007

Hosted by East Tennessee State University,
Johnson City, Tennessee.
Conference Location: The Millennium Centre,
Johnson City, Tennessee.
Conference Hotel: The Carnegie Hotel,
Johnson City, Tennessee.

Photographs from the Conference
Matthew Templeton's account of the conference on the AAVSO web site



Important Links:

Conference Topics:

  • Red Giant Stars
  • Supergiant Stars
  • Horizontal Branch Stars
  • Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars
  • OH/IR Stars
  • Proto-Planetary Nebulae
In relation to atmospheres, circumstellar envelopes, interiors, evolution, and planets around such objects based on observation (both variability and spectra), modeling and theoretical work.

To download the conference poster, click here.

There was an optional excursion to the Gray Fossil Site and Museum on Wednesday July 18, from 3-6 PM. This very rich fossil site, which covers 4-5 acres in nearby Gray, Tennessee, was discovered in May 2000 during road construction. It has been dated to between 4.5 and 7 million years old (late Miocene - early Pliocene). Species found so far at this site include a new species of red panda, a new species of weasel, the rhino Teleoceras, the short-faced bear Plionarctos, ground sloths, and many others.

Johnson City is in the extreme northeast region of Tennessee, nestled in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Two other cities neighbor Johnson City, Bristol and Kingsport, which gives this area the name of "The TriCities". These cities are serviced by the TriCity, Tennessee (TRI) regional airport. Weather in July is typically sunny with highs in the low- to mid-80s and lows in the mid-60s. ETSU is primarily an undergraduate institution with an adjacent medical school. The total student population is approximately 12,000 students.

This meeting was the third in a series of astronomical conferences hosted by ETSU. The previous two were "The Nature and Evolution of Disks Around Hot Stars" (Summer 2004) and "Probing the Distant Universe with Gravitational Waves" (Fall 2005).

 

Organizing Committee:


This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0721663.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


Last updated 30 June 2008 by D. G. Luttermoser