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Women's Studies Program

Department of Literature and Language

Any of the classes below may be taken to fulfill a requirement for the Women's Studies minor. or stop by our office (Campus Center Building 211) if you have questions.

 

Summer 2018

Dual Session (June 4-Aug 10)

SOWK 4567/5567—Human Sexuality  (Section 990) Mullins (ONLINE)
This survey course on human sexuality introduces students to sexual attitudes, sexual physiology and response, sexual techniques and behavior, reproduction and reproductive control, sexually transmitted diseases, and how sexualbehavior is learned and developed. It provides students with the opportunity for value clarification and exploration of personal and social attitudes toward varying forms of sexual behavior and orientations. 

 

Pre-Summer (May 14-June 1)

SOCI 3030– Gender and Society (Section 904) Schrift (ONLINE)
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1020 or permission of instructor. Study of the social construction of gender and its consequences for individuals and society. Examination of our cultural assumptions about gender identities, roles, behaviors, and the social processes that reproduce gender inequality.

 

Summer I (June 4-July 6)

WMST 2010-Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 910) Martin (ONLINE) 
This course provides a broad interdisciplinary perspective of the academic field of women’s studies. This course is, for the most part, taught thematically and covers topics that include women’s history; gender, race, and class; women and family; women and religion; women and work; women and the arts; women and politics; and women’s health.

WMST 2020-Women in Global Perspective (Section 910) Grubbs (ONLINE)
Emphasizes diversity of women’s experience in non-western, non-industrialized societies. Concentrates on women’s participation in, interaction with, and resistance to patriarchal structures that inhibit economic, political, and human rights for women. 

SOWK 1030– Cultural Diversity (Section 910) Thibeault (ONLINE)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the knowledge necessary for social work practice withdisadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed groups and to advance a philosophy that people come first and must be treated with dignity and respect. Issues of power, privilege, prejudice, discrimination,oppression, and civil rights, are central components.

 

Summer II (July 9-Aug 10)

 WMST 2010- Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 950) (ONLNE)
This introduction to the interdisciplinary academic field has a triple focus: integrating information about women’s contributions to culture and history into the curriculum, uncovering and understanding structures of oppression (gender, race, and class), and exploring possibilities for change. Topics will be drawn from material on social structures, law, language, history, religion, philosophy, healing professions, and the arts.

SOWK 4957-Harry Potter & the Quest for Social Justice (Section 050) Cummings (TR 10:00AM-1:45PM)
Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior. This class will take a two-pronged approach in analyzing the Harry Potter books and movies as they relate to social justice. Students will learn to analyze 4 themes central to social work: 1) the intersectionality of cultural identity, 2) effects of trauma 3) systems of power and privilege, 4) and the change agent(s).

 

Fall 2018 

WMST 2010– Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 001) Clark (TR 11:15AM-12:35PM)
This course provides a broad interdisciplinary perspective of the academic field of women’s studies.  In this course you will learn to speak  eloquently about gender andsexuality; examine your own preconceived notions about Gender; examine and deconstruct society’s underlying assumptions about Maleness and Femaleness; laugh at the absurd notions we all carry around about Gender, Sex and Women’s roles in everyday life.

WMST 2010 – Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 002) Tolley (TR 11:15AM-12:35PM)
Popular culture, e.g. Lady Gaga, Nikki Minaj, Jay Z, etc., and current events appear frequently because theydemonstrate the theories introduced in women’s studies and are relevant to the themes emphasized in this section (equality, identity, and social justice). This sectionencourages students to develop their voices (both written and oral) as a person and to express their perspective in a safe space.

WMST 2010 – Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 003) Wagner (TR 12:45PM-2:05PM)
This introduction to the interdisciplinary academic field has a triple focus: integrating information about women's contributions to culture and history into the curriculum, uncovering and understanding structures of oppression (gender, race, and class), and exploring change.

WMST 2010- Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 004)  Buck (TR 2:15PM-3:35PM)
Women's Studies examines how social structures andcultural heritage impact women in public life (e.g., work and politics), private life (e.g., family and relationships), and one's inner life (e.g., self-concept and genderidentity). Students are expected to make connections between the scholarship they read and their own lived experience. Assignments include reading responses,essays, quizzes, and reports on current events.

WMST 2010-Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 005 and 901) Grubbs (MW 1:40PM-3:00PM and ONLINE)
This introduction to the interdisciplinary academic field has a triple focus: integrating information about women's contributions to culture and history into the curriculum, uncovering and understanding structures of oppression (gender, race, and class), and exploring change. Section 005 will meet in person on Mondays and online Wednesdays; Section 901 is 100% online

WMST 2010-Intro to Women’s Studies (Section 902) Martin (ONLINE)
This course provides a broad interdisciplinaryperspective of the academic field of women’s studies. This course is, for the most part, taught thematically and covers topics that include women’s history; gender, race, and class; women and family; women and religion; women and work; women and the arts; women and politics; and women’s health.

WMST 2110—Sex, Gender, & the Body (Section 001) Novotny (MW 1:40PM-3:00PM )
An examination of the diverse and historically varying relationships forged between biological sex, culturally formulated discourses of masculinity and femininity, and the sexed body. Combining theoretical and historical texts from the fields of gender, sexuality, and disability studies with memoir, documentary, and visual art, this course investigates how the diverse experiences of embodiment are historically and culturally shaped. 

WMST 3330-Feminist Thought and Practice (Section 001) Grubbs (ONLINE)
Prerequisites: WMST 2010 or WMST 2020. Explores a variety of theoretical frameworks for studying women and gender and links feminist theory to social action and civic responsibility. 

WMST 4500-Capstone (Section 001) Thompson (TR 3:45PM-5:05PM)
This course is the culmination of your academic, campus, and community experience as a Women’s Studies major. You will revisit your past interdisciplinary academic work to assess yourintellectual development throughout your college career. You will then undertake a series of projects designed to help you place your skills within the context of your current and future civic, educational and/or professional goals. For more information email the instructor at .

MUSC 4957-Special Topics in Music (Section 001) Deadman (TR  2:15PM-3:35PM)
Explores the various ways women have engaged with music from the medieval times to the present. For much of this time women were a marginalized population whose contributions and involvement in music were hidden, discouraged or even forbidden, and yet courageous women still found ways to be involved with music as composers, performers, patrons, or teachers.  This class considers the societal attitudes to women as producers and consumers of music and suggests an alternative narrative to the oft-repeated story of the “Great (male) Composers.” This class will assume you have a basic knowledge of musical terminology and a broad outline of the history of music (as you get in a class like MUSC 1030 Introduction to Music).  Consult the instructor if you are unsure if you will have the necessary foundation to get the most out of the class.

MGMT-4460 – Organizational Leadership (Section 001) Moore (TR 12:45PM-2:05PM)
The study of leadership from an historical and contemporary perspective. Students will identify, apply, and reflect on aspects of leadership development. Topics cover personal assessment and development, values and ethics, power and influence, followership, group dynamics, controversy with civility, and citizenship. 

SPCH 4200—Gender & Communication (Section 001) Buerkle (MW 1:40PM-3:00PM)
Men are not from Mars, nor are women from Venus. Often, however, we are asked to think of identifying as male to female in such polarizing ways. This course investigates how communication practices affect or ideas about and experiences of gender as well as how ourgender may affect our own communication. You should leave the class more aware of the dynamics of gender on your journey to being a more effective and ethical communicator.

SOWK 1030– Cultural Diversity (Section 002) Yarosh (T 12:35PM-2:05PM)  (four other sections online)
The dual purpose of this course is to introduce the knowledge necessary for social work practice withdisadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed groups and to advance a philosophy that people come first and must be treated with dignity and respect. Issues of power, privilege, prejudice, discrimination, oppression, civil rights, historical and legal heritage, and contemporary news events are central course components.

HDAL 2340—Understanding Cultural Diversity (Section 901 and 902) ONLINE
The purpose of the course is to assist students in developing awareness of biases, prejudice and  discrimination on an individual level as well as a community and national level and to develop personal skills that will enable the student to work and live more effectively with diverse groups of people. Primary course topics include race and racism, gender and sexism, affectional orientation, heterosexism and homophobia, socio-economic differences among groups and religious and political affiliations. 

ENGL 3500-Women Authors (Section 001) Thompson (TR 11:15AM-12:35PM)
This course surveys more than seven centuries of women’s poetry, fiction, and drama. We will consider better-known authors such as Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, George Eliot, Gwendolyn Brooks and Sandra Cisneros along with many less prominent, but no less talented writers such as Aemilia Lanyer, Fanny Fern, Pauline Hopkins, Radclyffe Hall, and Margaret Edson. Text: The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English, 3rd Edition.  For more information about course content and texts, email the instructor at thompsop@etsu.edu.

SOCI-3030 – Gender and Society (Section 001) Hirsch (MWF 12:35PM-1:30PM)
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1020 or permission of instructor. Study of the social construction of gender and its consequences for individuals and society. Examination of our cultural assumptions about gender identities, roles, behaviors, and the social processes that reproduce gender inequality.

PHIL 3110 – Philosophies of Feminism (Section 001) MacAvoy (MWF 10:25AM-11:20AM)
Examination of the major forms of feminist theory and also the role, functions and limitations of theory in addressing gender-related issues. Prerequisite(s): Two (2) PHIL courses at the 1000 - 2000 level or permission of the instructor.

HIST 3926-Gender in US History to 1877 (Section 001) Nash (TR 9:45AM-11:05AM)
A historical survey that examines and analyzes the social, political, , cultural, religious, economic, psychological as well as other aspects of gender and sexuality in American history from the colonial period through Reconstruction. 


LEAD 4467 - Leadership Theory and Practice (Section 201) Harley-McClaskey (W 4:00PM-6:50PM)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 60 credit hours. The study of leadership from a historical and contemporary perspective. Students identify, apply, and reflect on aspects of leadership development, including concepts of personal change toward effective leadership in a changing environment. Topics cover personal assessment and development, values and ethics, power and influence, followership, group dynamics, controversy with civility, and citizenship. Students observe a decision-making group outside of class over the course of the semester.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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